Industry News: Volume 10, Issue 23

Economic analysis of the prevalence and clinical and economic burden of medication error in England

By Rachel Ann Elliott, Elizabeth Camacho, Dina Jankovic, Mark J Sculpher, Rita Faria

Qualitysafety.bmj.com – Medication is the most widely used medical intervention. Harm caused by medication is referred to as an adverse drug event (ADE), and includes medication errors, adverse drug reactions, allergic reactions and overdoses.

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Green light for foreigners ‘Ordinary tourists’ pushed to back of queue

By MONGKOL BANGPRAPA AND APINYA WIPATAYOTIN

Bangkokpost.com – The first group of foreigners to be allowed to enter Thailand will comprise business representatives, skilled workers, experts, people with Thai families, teachers, students and patients who agree to quarantine, according to the government.

Taweesilp Visanuyothin, spokesman of the Centre for Covid-19 Situation Administration (CCSA), on Wednesday elaborated on the government’s plan to allow foreign nationals back into the country.

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The Pandemic Is Pushing Scientists To Rethink How They Read Research Papers

By Richard Harris

npr.org – The coronavirus pandemic has posed a special challenge for scientists: Figuring out how to make sense of a flood of scientific papers from labs and scientists unfamiliar to them.

More than 6,000 coronavirus-related preprints from researchers around the world have been posted since the pandemic began, without the usual peer review as a quality check.

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Herd immunity strategies called into question after coronavirus antibody study in Spain

By Chloe Taylor

CNBC.com – Covid-19 antibodies in Spain’s population “are insufficient to provide herd immunity,” a new study has claimed, despite the country being one of the worst-affected by the pandemic.

In a peer-reviewed paper published in the Lancet medical journal Monday, researchers from Harvard, MIT and several Spanish institutions analyzed findings from a widescale study on antibody prevalence in Spain.

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Doctors say experimental treatment may have rid man of HIV

By MARILYNN MARCHIONE

Apnews.com – A Brazilian man infected with the AIDS virus has shown no sign of it for more than a year since he stopped HIV medicines after an intense experimental drug therapy aimed at purging hidden, dormant virus from his body, doctors reported Tuesday.

The case needs independent verification and it’s way too soon to speculate about a possible cure, scientists cautioned.

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