Industry News: Volume 4 Issue 1

In new milestone, the majority of U.S. medical students are now women

by Joanne Finnegan

fiercehealthcare.com – Female medical students have hit a milestone.

They now comprise the majority of enrolled U.S. medical students for the first time, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

To view the original article in its entirety, click here.  


U.S. primary care doctors face challenges in coordinating care

Medicalxpress.com – Physicians from the United States and other high-income countries report difficulties with care coordination, with a substantial proportion of U.S. physicians not receiving timely notification or the information needed from specialists or other sites of care, according to a study published online Dec. 10 in Health Affairs.

Michelle M. Doty, M.P.H., Ph.D., from the Commonwealth Fund in New York City, and colleagues queried primary care physicians in 11 high-income countries about their ability to coordinate patients’ medical care with specialists, across settings of care, and with social service providers to inform efforts to improve care coordination.

To view the original article in its entirety, click here.  


In the U.S., an Angioplasty Costs $32,000. Elsewhere? Maybe $6,400.

By Margot Sanger-Katz

Nytimes.com – A study of international prices finds American patients pay much more across a wide array of common services.

To view the original article in its entirety, click here.


Providers get win in surprise billing compromise, but they’re not happy

by Robert King

Fiercehealthcare.com – Major bipartisan healthcare legislation to outlaw surprise medical bills will include an arbitration backstop for out-of-network charges in a massive win for the provider industry.

But hospital and provider groups are already signaling that the concession isn’t enough.

To view the original article in its entirety, click here. 


Americans are still pretty happy with their private health insurance

By Tami Luhby

Cnn.com – Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren may not like private health insurance, but many Americans do.

Some 71% of Americans rate their private coverage as “excellent” or “good,” according to the latest Gallup poll, released Monday.

To view the original article in its entirety, click here.


House approves $1.4 trillion spending deal to avert shutdown, sends to Senate

By Amanda Becker, Richard Cowan

reuters.com – The U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday approved a $1.4 trillion spending package to avert a partial government shutdown that also would raise the U.S. tobacco purchasing age to 21 and permanently repeal several of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) taxes.

The spending package now heads to the Senate, where lawmakers aim to approve it before current government funding runs out on Saturday, avoiding the type of messy budget battle that resulted in a record 35-day interruption of government services late last year and early this year.

To view the original article in its entirety, click here.  


Nearly half the U.S. population will be obese by 2030

By Shraddha Chakradhar

statnews.com New data that estimate rates of obesity at the state level in the U.S. find that by 2030, nearly half of all Americans will be obese. The prevalence of obesity will be higher than 50% in 29 states in the next 10 years, and no state will have an obesity rate of less than 35%.

To view the original article in its entirety, click here.  


Trump administration proposes limited drug importation from Canada

BY NATHANIEL WEIXEL

thehill.com – The Trump administration is laying the groundwork to allow some cheaper prescription drugs to be imported from Canada.

The administration is issuing a proposed rule, along with a proposed guidance for the drug industry, that will allow states, pharmacies, wholesalers and manufacturers to import prescription drugs if they meet conditions designed to ensure that the importation poses no additional risk to safety and will save consumers money.

To view the original article in its entirety, click here.  


One in Four Americans Delay Their Care Due to Cost

BY LYDIA SAAD

news.gallup.com – A record 25% of Americans say they or a family member put off treatment for a serious medical condition in the past year because of the cost, up from 19% a year ago and the highest in Gallup’s trend. Another 8% said they or a family member put off treatment for a less serious condition, bringing the total percentage of households delaying care due to costs to 33%, tying the high from 2014.

Gallup first asked this question in 1991, at which time 22% reported that they or a family member delayed care for any kind of condition, including 11% for a serious condition.

To view the original article in its entirety, click here.  

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